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How to Cope With the Stress of Finding A New Job

Finding a new job can be very stressful, especially if you are not getting any interviews or job offers. Here are some strategies to help you deal with the stress of job hunting.

Coping with the stress of finding a new job

 

Don’t Take Rejection Personally

The most important thing to remember is that a lack of progress in your job search is not something to take personally. There are many reasons that employers pass over job candidates. Try not to let that rejection impact your self-esteem or feelings of self-worth. Remember that you have value as a person apart from your career. Remind yourself that, eventually, the right job will come along. Turn to friends and family for support. Spending time with people who care about you will help remind you that you are valued. Talk about your feelings regarding your job search with someone you trust.

Don’t Let Finding A New Job Be Your Sole Focus

It can be easy to be consumed by finding a new job, but it’s not healthy to have tunnel vision where your job search is concerned. Separating your work life from your private life is essential, even when your “work life” consists solely of trying to find work. Spend a set amount of time each day trying to find a new job, and then give yourself permission to spend the rest of your time focusing on other things like family, friends, or hobbies you enjoy. This will keep you from becoming overwhelmed by your job search and the stress that it brings.

Focus on Being the Best Employee You Can Be

If you are currently employed, give your all every day at work. This can be difficult when you are in a job or career that you are unhappy with, but being a good employee is what will eventually get you the job that you desire. A solid work ethic is something that all employers value. If you are not currently employed, find ways to increase your employability. This could mean learning a new skill or getting a certification. Evaluate what the ideal job candidate for your dream job looks like and then do everything you can to become that person.

Re-evaluate Your Job Search Tactics

Identifying possible reasons for the lack of progress in finding a new job can help improve your outcomes. Take a serious look at the positions you are applying to and make sure that you meet more than 60% of the key qualifications and requirements. If you don’t meet at least 60% of the criteria, then you aren’t likely to be a top candidate. If you meet the qualifications, make sure you are tweaking your resume to target it to each position. Doing this shows employers that you are serious about wanting the position. It also makes it much easier for them to see why you are a good fit. Getting a second opinion on your resume is also a good idea. This can help you see potential red flags that are preventing you from getting interviews. We would be happy to review your resume for free, just send it over!

Seek Assistance

If you are at a loss on how to get your resume into the interview pile, our professional resume writers can help. We will work with you to identify accomplishments and value that you can bring to a new employer. We will also make sure that your resume is targeted toward the positions you want so that hiring managers view you as a top candidate. Check out the resume packages we have to offer and select the one that best meets your needs.

How to Create an Effective Resume

As a professional resume writer, I hear all the time from clients that, “I’ll start my job search as soon as I have my resume written.” That sounds like a great way to do things, right? I mean, you need to have a resume in order to apply for jobs when you find them, so it seems logical to write the resume before beginning the job search. But, how do you write a resume that says, “Hire me, I am the perfect fit for the position at your company!” if you don’t know what position or company you are aiming for? What ultimately ends up happening in this situation is that you end up with a generic resume that doesn’t really stand out to anyone. Then, you wonder why you’re never getting called back for any interviews, and you quickly get discouraged in your job search, wondering why no one is impressed with you.

Job Search

So, should you not even bother thinking about your resume until after you have found positions that you are interested in? Not exactly. It is a good idea to create a generic resume before beginning your job search. Why? Because it helps you identify your skills and interests and can help guide your job search. But, that generic resume should not be the one you actually send out after you find the position you want.

After Your Job Search, Identify Your Strengths

After you find a position, go back to that generic resume and tailor it to the specific job posting. How do you do that? First, go through the job posting and making a list of keywords that describe the job duties and requirements of the position. Then make a list of specific experience that you have related to each of those duties and requirements. While you might not have specific experience related to every single keyword on your list, it is important to make sure that you have experience in more than half of them. If you demonstrate your qualifications, then it will be hard to convince a hiring manager that you are actually qualified for the job.

Leave Off Details That Are Not Relevant

Now go back to your generic resume. Begin with the Experience section. For each job in that section, make sure that the duties/responsibilities that most closely match the keywords on your list are the first bullet points listed. If you have several bullet points that describe duties or responsibilities that are not on your keyword list, consider leaving many of them off — hiring managers are most interested in how you can meet the specific role that you are applying for, and having a lot of information on your resume that does not relate to the position can be seen as a waste of their time.

Quantify Your Experience

After adding bullet points related to the job posting wherever possible in your Experience section, take another look at these bullet points. For each bullet point, try to answer the questions, “How many?” “How much?” “How often?” to quantify your experience. Also ask yourself, “how did this benefit the company? What value did I bring to the company?” Answering these questions will help you write bullet points that show how valuable you are as an employee, giving hiring managers a reason to invest in you.

Highlight Your Qualifications in Your Career Summary

The Experience section of your resume is your opportunity to show that you have the experience the hiring manager is looking for, but it is not the only part of your resume that needs to be tailored to the specific job position. The Career Summary at the top of your resume is also a great place to highlight your value. From the job posting, what appears to be most important to this company? Which skills and experience do they stress most? Those things should be included in your Career Summary section. Directly below your Career Summary, include a Core Competency section using words from your keyword list. This helps applicant tracking systems see that you have the necessary experience for the job.

If you take the time to tweak your resume specifically for each job position you are interested in, it shows hiring managers that you are serious about wanting THIS job. Hiring managers don’t want someone who is applying to everything under the sun. They want someone who is excited about their company. Show that you truly want this job. This will help you get the interviews and job offer you are hoping for.

Want help creating a resume that will get you more interviews? Let us help! Find the perfect resume package to meet your needs.